Public Discussion

  • Icon for: Kevin Brown

    Kevin Brown

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 10:11 a.m.

    Love the community/family involvement aspect of the program! I’m wondering if in the Funds of Knowledge framework the cultural backgrounds of students and their families provide unique opportunities for teaching STEM content and, if so, how these might be leveraged for teaching STEM outside of a Native American context? Also, are there plans to create a more formal, classroom version of the program?

  • Icon for: Rosi Andrade

    Rosi Andrade

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 03:58 a.m.

    Thanks for your commentary. I find that funds of knowledge are applicable to all communities, with each community defining it’s own practices and ways of teaching their children. It absolutely has relevance.
    we are producing a Teacher Resource Manual for teachers as well as a Parent Manual on ways of supporting children’s inquiry and interest in iSEM.

  • Icon for: Brian Belland

    Brian Belland

    Associate Professor
    May 12, 2015 | 11:41 a.m.

    interesting project! I was wondering whether you think the family involvement in your project would be feasible in other American education contexts. I think it could be potentially very powerful, if for no other reason that having parents and other family involved in a child’s education helps the child see that education is highly valued, and drawing on community members’ expertise can lend a welcome hand to teachers.

  • Icon for: Rosi Andrade

    Rosi Andrade

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 03:58 a.m.

    This work has been carried out in several of Professor Luis Moll’s research projects and others (Mathematics Professor Marta Civil).
    Thank you for the feedback!

  • Icon for: Joni Falk

    Joni Falk

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 01:34 p.m.

    Thank you for this video. I think having families participate in youth field trips is fantastic. Not only do you get to build on families funds of knowledge, but parents and grandparents get exposure to what students are learning. You mention one on one mentoring but do not speak much about that. Can you tell me more about this component of the program? Do you have any evidence of impact on students or community? You left me eager to hear more!

  • Icon for: Rosi Andrade

    Rosi Andrade

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 04:07 a.m.

    One on one mentoring is facilitated by Strength Building Partners mentoring program which works to match children with a mentor. Please contact Pam Clark Raines to find out more about the program. Sally Stevens, are working to complete an

  • Icon for: CHARLES MATTHEWS

    CHARLES MATTHEWS

    Research Scientist
    May 12, 2015 | 03:43 p.m.

    I’m adding my thanks to those above, Sally. In my projec, we are sharing lesson videos among teachers nationwide. Your lessons seem different from any that we have. I would like very much to have lessons from your teachers—lessons that they are willing to share for the benefit of teachers in other areas of the US. We record lessons, assist with editing, and (with the teacher’s approval) post for other teachers to view and discuss. Although my matthewscc@umsl.edu address is a Missouri university, I live and work from Green Valley, AZ.

  • Icon for: Deborah Kariuki

    Deborah Kariuki

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2015 | 05:16 a.m.

    Well done focused video. The focus on the Native American and culturally and geographical relevant material for the students using mentors is quite unique. How would you scale this program for other underrepresented groups in STEM where they could have mentors to work with at the same time have culturally relevant STEM activities? The activities the students participate in including siblings and parents must make for very interesting communications, thank you for this video.

  • Icon for: Rosi Andrade

    Rosi Andrade

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 03:11 p.m.

    I would encourage you to explore the literature on funds of knowledge, the work of Prof. Luis Moll. The sociocultural context being the key.

    Thank you for your feedback.

  • Small default profile

    Barbara Berns

    Guest
    May 14, 2015 | 11:53 a.m.

    I’m a little unclear about the relationship between formal and informal education. Agree with all the comments about the very important role of families. And a shout out to CADRE Fellow Corey Knox!

  • Icon for: Rosi Andrade

    Rosi Andrade

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 03:10 p.m.

    Hi Barbara,

    What an existential point you make about learning. I love it!
    Rosi

  • Icon for: Rosi Andrade

    Rosi Andrade

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 04:08 a.m.

    Hi Deborah, excellent questions. My belief that is that it is essential to learn about the families, communities and children’s lives in out of school activities. From that knowledge we learn and create relevant learning opportunities. This is Funds of Knowledge. In the process. Stong bonds between family, school and community have opportunities to the hold and flourish.

  • Icon for: Deborah Kariuki

    Deborah Kariuki

    Facilitator
    May 15, 2015 | 09:12 p.m.

    I agreen Rosi good answer. All students indeed come to us with their suitcases of life experiences and it up to us the educators to ensure that we do not divorce them from those experiences but actually harness them to encourage meaningful learning.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.

  1. Sally Stevens
  2. Distinguished Outreach Professor
  3. iSTEM
  4. http://istemtucson.weebly.com
  5. University of Arizona SIROW
  1. Rosi Andrade
  2. Associate Research Professor
  3. iSTEM
  4. http://istemtucson.weebly.com
  5. University of Arizona SIROW

iSTEM: Engaging Native American Youth in STEM
NSF Award #: 1139317

iSTEM: Engaging Native American Youth in STEM: This video highlights 3rd – 8th grade Native American students engaged in informal science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) activities in a National Science Foundation funded project, iSTEM. Working with three k-12 public schools in southern Arizona, the iSTEM project combines a mentoring program with informal science activities. Students are paired with an adult mentor who is a STEM professional, university student, and/or tribal member. The informal science activities are thematically driven (e.g. solar energy; mapping and GIS; soils, space and Earth; watershed; ecology, health) and include hands-on “flash” STEM activities engaged in during student lunch breaks along with a thematically related community-located field trips. This video includes short segments of students engaged in various iSTEM project activities that are guided by a Funds of Knowledge framework – highlighting the project’s efforts to make the STEM activities culturally and geographically relevant.