Public Discussion

  • Icon for: Iliya Gutin

    Iliya Gutin

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 11:38 a.m.

    This is a great program! I would love to hear a little bit more about how the project was able to gauge improvements in student learning outcomes and confidence with technology. What were some of the metrics that were used, and did you find some students were more responsive to using technology than others?

    Thanks!

  • Icon for: Shiang-Kwei Wang

    Shiang-Kwei Wang

    Presenter
    May 13, 2015 | 08:04 a.m.

    We use 45 New York State science regent exam test bank to measure students’ science learning outcome. We also developed a survey “New Literacy Scenarios” and adopted a survey “ICT skills” to compare their pre-post confidence in using technology. This article published by Computers & Education provides you the details of the measurement: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pi...

    Let me know if you need more information!

  • Icon for: Brian Drayton

    Brian Drayton

    Co-Principal Investigator
    May 12, 2015 | 01:18 p.m.

    I went to your website and read the Year 2 findings posted there — that’s how interesting this video was. In a research project that Joni Falk and I had a few years ago, we also noted the disjunction between teachers’ comfort with technology and students’ — and also saw that the technologies that each were most effective with were quite different. As you say, a lot comes down to the different purposes for which each group tends to use technology — and also their different levels of experience and comfort with the basic cognitive/science practices. So it’s interesting to pose the question (to students and to teachers): Given an interesting science inquiry, what technologies do I know that might help me get on with the inquiry? Watching what happens as people grapple with that question is interesting!

  • Icon for: Shiang-Kwei Wang

    Shiang-Kwei Wang

    Presenter
    May 13, 2015 | 09:49 a.m.

    Thank you Brian! We choose free and reliable ICTs (such as Google Form, spreadsheet) to focus on how these technology can develop students’ cognitive skills. Once teachers/students learn the features of these technologies, they learn how to solve other problems with these tools. For example they practiced how to use Google Earth to conduct investigation of finches, then they use the same skills to conduct investigation about earthquakes or volcanoes. It’s really interesting to see their creativity and come up with something we never expected!

  • Icon for: Tony Streit

    Tony Streit

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 10:46 p.m.

    I agree with Brian – it is always compelling when inquiry drive the use of tools rather than the other way around. Your piece is a nice example of how basic student-centered, project-based learning practices are key to making technology relevant in the classroom. I would love to hear more about how your educators embrace, or struggled with, applying PBL, especially what you are learning about the power dynamic shifts required between student and educator. What’s the biggest lesson learned?

  • Icon for: Shiang-Kwei Wang

    Shiang-Kwei Wang

    Presenter
    May 13, 2015 | 09:51 a.m.

    Tony, I totally agree with you that many educators integrate technology just because they have access to it, not because of the pedagogical needs. The most significant change is that teachers gradually shift the responsibility of learning to students. They also use Edmodo and upload their projects for peer to review. Edmodo facilitates learning at home and allows teachers to conduct more PBL in the classroom.

  • Icon for: Sarah Rand

    Sarah Rand

    Facilitator
    May 14, 2015 | 08:35 p.m.

    Are there other kinds of programs like this? This seems unique and necessary for teachers- I haven’t heard of anything like this.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.

  1. Shiang-Kwei Wang
  2. https://sites.google.com/site/drshiangkweiwang/
  3. Associate Dean
  4. Develop digital natives' new literacy skills using ICTs
  5. http://nyit.edu/cyberlearning
  6. New York Institute of Technology
  1. Daniel Coster
  2. Professor
  3. Develop digital natives' new literacy skills using ICTs
  4. http://nyit.edu/cyberlearning
  5. Utah State University
  1. Hui-Yin Hsu
  2. https://sites.google.com/site/drhuiyinhsu
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Develop digital natives' new literacy skills using ICTs
  5. http://nyit.edu/cyberlearning
  6. New York Institute of Technology
  1. Max Longhurst
  2. Education Specialist
  3. Develop digital natives' new literacy skills using ICTs
  4. http://nyit.edu/cyberlearning
  5. Utah State University
  1. David Todd Campbell
  2. http://education.uconn.edu/todd-campbell/
  3. Associate Professor
  4. Develop digital natives' new literacy skills using ICTs
  5. http://nyit.edu/cyberlearning
  6. University of Connecticut

Develop digital natives' new literacy skills using ICTs
NSF Award #: 1020091

Digital natives are no more technology savvy than their teachers, according to our study. The gap of technology usage at schools lies in teachers’ lack of knowledge and skills in integrating technology. Our project prepared 45 NYC teachers how to develop their students’ new literacy skills through the use of free, reliable technology. Teachers went through two years of training, learn how to use ICTs, what is the new literacy framework, and how to conduct inquiry activities using technologies. The results show that students are much more motivated when teachers meaningfully integrate technology. They have better learning outcomes, and stronger confidence in using technology. Students use these technologies to develop their cognitive skills and apply their inquiry skills.