Public Discussion

  • Icon for: Priscilla Laws

    Priscilla Laws

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2015 | 09:19 a.m.

    As a member of the Interactive Video Vignette (IVV) development team, I really enjoyed helping with the production of this video. This video showcase is about presenting a project extremely briefly, just are our IVVs are about helping students learning key concepts in just a few minutes!

  • Icon for: Amie Patchen

    Amie Patchen

    Facilitator
    May 11, 2015 | 10:36 a.m.

    Great overview of the project! I really like the prediction and frame-by-frame aspects of the videos. I’m curious about your plans for the future of the videos. How do you envision them being integrated into courses? Will they be required for students or optional supplements? Are you hoping to produce videos for all the major topics in different courses (which ones?) or focus specifically on topics that have been challenging for students?

  • Icon for: David Jackson

    David Jackson

    Co-Presenter
    May 11, 2015 | 11:04 a.m.

    Hi Amie,

    Right now we have been using IVV’s mainly as homework supplements. We have found that it is important to assign a small amount of completion credit for each Vignette. We have started by developing IVVs on topics that are particularly challenging, but we are working to branch out into all the major (and even some minor) topics.

  • Icon for: L. Kate Wright

    L. Kate Wright

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2015 | 12:07 p.m.

    Hi Amie,

    We’re trying to use the Biology vignettes as out of class “priming” activities. Our goal is to help students understand some basic concepts before getting to class. Then we can use class time for activities to build on their knowledge.
    Kate

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    Wendy Watson

    Guest
    May 11, 2015 | 03:10 p.m.

    Great- I love the aha aspect and engaging students in the project so they don’t view and forget!

  • Icon for: Beth Sanzenbacher

    Beth Sanzenbacher

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 12:23 a.m.

    A wonderful resource! As a teacher I am constantly looking for meaningful and productive homework to reinforce concepts learned and skills practices in the classroom, and the IVV program appears perfect.

    This project has great potential for scale, and I have several questions related to that. Are IVV web-based? What type of connection speed is required? What age are these videos targeted for? Are there plans to expand IVV content and audience? Are there any teacher tracking tools integrated into IVV (such as being able to see how many a student has completed or student responses)?

    The building your own IVV has great potential, particularly as an assessment piece for student learning. Do you have any plans or ideas around that?

  • Icon for: David Jackson

    David Jackson

    Co-Presenter
    May 12, 2015 | 08:26 a.m.

    Hi Beth,

    Yes, IVVs are web-based, and given that videos are incorporated, a reasonably good connection makes things work more smoothly.

    The IVVs we’ve been working on are all aimed at the introductory college level, but many (if not all) could easily be used at the high school level. But there is no reason a vignette couldn’t be made to target any audience one wants. We have plans to expand the content to include much of the standard introductory physics curriculum and some others are experimenting with vignettes in biology. There is also software that will allow anyone to make a vignette, so the sky is the limit in terms of what someone can produce and for which audience.

    There are tracking tools built into the software so that an instructor can determine things like how many students completed the vignette and the amount of time spent on each part of the vignette. This is very useful for research purposes.

  • Icon for: Robert Teese

    Robert Teese

    Presenter
    May 12, 2015 | 10:11 a.m.

    Beth,
    The vignettes we are using in our research have tracking tools built in. However, the ones we distribute on www.compadre.org/ivv do not. The reason is that maintaining a back-end server with a database is too much work for an average teacher.
    One of the challenges we are working on now is finding ways for teachers to use vignettes easily. If we end up partnering with a publisher or online homework system, then tracking tools will probably be there.
    The first page of any vignette you download from www.compadre.org/ivv is a logon page asking for the student’s name. The last page of the vignette is a certificate page that shows the logon name along with information like the date and the time required to complete the vignette. The student prints this and turns it in to get completion credit.

  • Icon for: Beth Sanzenbacher

    Beth Sanzenbacher

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 01:12 p.m.

    From an 8th Grade student, “The make your own IVV looks really fun for a group project.”

  • Icon for: Robert Teese

    Robert Teese

    Presenter
    May 12, 2015 | 01:52 p.m.

    We’ve tried letting a few college students make their own vignettes in advanced lab courses, but like any project involving video it can take a lot of effort. It might actually work better with eighth graders. Even though making them takes time, we enjoy what we’re doing!
    The software lets people view the vignette right away in a web browser on their own computer. Putting a vignette on the Internet is harder, especially as schools get more restrictive about faculty running their own servers. For a class project, though, looking at it in class should be fine.

  • Icon for: Beth Sanzenbacher

    Beth Sanzenbacher

    Facilitator
    May 13, 2015 | 10:48 p.m.

    8th graders and middle schoolers are highly motivated by video production, so this just seems like the perfect fit!

  • Icon for: Tammy Pirmann

    Tammy Pirmann

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 02:03 p.m.

    Interesting project! I like the idea and could see it being applied to many subjects.

  • Icon for: Robert Teese

    Robert Teese

    Presenter
    May 12, 2015 | 02:45 p.m.

    Thanks. We began the project about five years ago in Physics at RIT and Dickinson College. A group at Bethel University is running a project to make vignette-like activities for advanced physics labs using our software. Last year a group at RIT and Alfred University has started making vignettes in Biology. I agree that the idea could be used in many disciplines.

  • Icon for: CHARLES MATTHEWS

    CHARLES MATTHEWS

    Research Scientist
    May 12, 2015 | 02:52 p.m.

    Thanks and congratulations on your ideas — great way to describe what you are doing. I hope to follow your project in the future. (It’s good to see my daughter’s master’s degree school (RIT) faculty on video).

  • Icon for: L. Kate Wright

    L. Kate Wright

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2015 | 12:04 a.m.

    I hope your daughter is happy with her M.S. program at RIT! Thanks for your comments!

    Kate

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    Jeremy CIRCCenter.org

    Guest
    May 13, 2015 | 07:34 a.m.

    The tool for producing interactive videos seems like it would be broadly useful to the innovative educators — I hope it gets lots of attention through this showcase. Once it is, it seems there would be tons of questions one could ask about how it is getting used, and which uses of interaction during video yield benefits. Do you have analytics built in, so once your tool is out there at scale, you can analyze usage?

  • Icon for: Robert Teese

    Robert Teese

    Presenter
    May 13, 2015 | 08:57 a.m.

    Jeremy, the analytics we are collecting during the research phase tell us how long students spend on each page, what multiple-choice answers they select, how many times they click on a video during video analysis measurements, and the order in which they proceed. The reason I mention order is that we can have “branching” multiple-choice questions where each answer choice leads to a different next page. Up to now we’ve been concentrating on learning gains so I can’t report anything about usage yet.
    As I said in a reply above, whether or not analytics survive in the final product depends on how we end up partnering with organizations that run servers with databases. The analytic-free vignettes we create, and the Vignette Studio tool itself, will remain available for download free-of-charge.

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    Larry Engelhardt

    Guest
    May 13, 2015 | 08:03 a.m.

    I have used IVVs for my classes this year, and several of my colleagues are using them also. A key selling point is that there is a very low barrier to adoption: You can tell your colleagues, “Look by giving students this 10 minute activity that they complete OUTSIDE OF CLASS, they are able to achieve significant learning gains (at least for Newton’s 3rd Law).”

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    Andrew DiCola

    Guest
    May 13, 2015 | 01:12 p.m.

    Nice! Wasn’t that Derek Muller in the last scene?

  • Icon for: Robert Teese

    Robert Teese

    Presenter
    May 13, 2015 | 01:13 p.m.

    Yes, Derek Muller, creator of veritasium.com, did the Bullet-Block experiment with us two summers ago. He made a series of YouTube videos about it https://youtu.be/vWVZ6APXM4w and we made a vignette http://www.compadre.org/ivv/vignettes/bulletBlo....

  • Icon for: Priscilla Laws

    Priscilla Laws

    Co-Presenter
    May 13, 2015 | 01:32 p.m.

    Yes, as Bob just noted, Derek joined Bob Teese, David Jackson and me for several days in the Summer of 2013. We shot the Bullet Block in the country a few miles from Dickinson College. The co-narrator was Catrina Hamilton-Drager, one of our Dickinson College astronomer/physicists who happens to be a rifle expert.

  • Icon for: CHARLES MATTHEWS

    CHARLES MATTHEWS

    Research Scientist
    May 13, 2015 | 08:45 p.m.

    Thanks for your excellent condtribution to the showcase and to teachers and students

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    Lori Andersen

    Guest
    May 13, 2015 | 10:29 p.m.

    I loved participating in the Newton’s 3rd Law vignette. I would love to see some of these developed for concepts in elementary science.

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    Naseer Chughtai

    Guest
    May 14, 2015 | 07:32 a.m.

    I like the idea of prediction and then presenting project clarify the student’s misconception. A short video is a quick way of understanding the concept. Thanks every body who is involve in it.

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    Robert Hobbs

    Guest
    May 14, 2015 | 01:09 p.m.

    I was about to comment, then stopped. I had already decided that I wanted to attend the workshop on this exciting tool at the AAPT summer meeting. I realized that I should register first, then praise the idea. I did not want the workshop to fill up before I got there. So now I am registered and can give my opinion.

    We already employ video analysis in our department and have significant on-line interactive components to many of our courses. These are largely text based or text with an applet. I have also been posting review materials as screenshot videos of presentation slide summaries to provide an audio voiceover. However those are not interactive. I am convinced of the value of active engagement. This is an exciting extension that can immediately find practitioners here at Bellevue college.

    See you all this summer!!

  • Icon for: Kathleen Koenig

    Kathleen Koenig

    Co-Presenter
    May 14, 2015 | 01:22 p.m.

    We are really glad you will be joining us this summer for our AAPT workshop! I have been using the IVVs in my introductory physics courses for multiple semesters now and I can tell you firsthand that students really like these. They are not boring lectures and student comments have been overwhelmingly positive in terms of the IVVs themselves and how they have helped their learning of concepts.

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    Leila Philip

    Guest
    May 15, 2015 | 02:43 p.m.

    These look excellent . I could imagine using them to teach an interdisciplinary course on science writing . Thank you for your work on these . Inspiring !

  • Icon for: David Jackson

    David Jackson

    Co-Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 03:12 p.m.

    Yes, I can see vignettes being used in so many different ways. They are limited only by the imagination of the professor/teacher.

  • Icon for: Kathy Perkins

    Kathy Perkins

    Director
    May 15, 2015 | 05:19 p.m.

    Great video, folks! I love how flexible you have made these tools with supporting creation of new video vignettes and branching into other disciplines. And its great to see the learning impact data.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.

  1. Robert Teese
  2. Professor of Physics
  3. Interactive Video Vignettes
  4. http://www.compadre.org/ivv/
  5. Rochester Institute of Tech
  1. David Jackson
  2. Associate Professor
  3. Interactive Video Vignettes
  4. http://www.compadre.org/ivv/
  5. Dickinson College
  1. Kathleen Koenig
  2. Associate Professor of Physics & STEM Education
  3. Interactive Video Vignettes
  4. http://www.compadre.org/ivv/
  5. University of Cincinnati
  1. Priscilla Laws
  2. Research Professor of Physics
  3. Interactive Video Vignettes
  4. http://www.compadre.org/ivv/
  5. Dickinson College
  1. L. Kate Wright
  2. Assistant Professor, Gosnell School of Life Sciences
  3. Interactive Video Vignettes
  4. http://www.compadre.org/ivv/
  5. Rochester Institute of Tech
 
 
 
 
Facilitators’, Presenters’,
& Public Choice

Interactive Video Vignettes
NSF Award #: DUE-1122828

Interactive Video Vignettes are short web-based assignments for introductory science students. They combine the convenience of online video coupled with video analysis as well as the interactivity of an individual tutorial. Each vignette produced by these projects addresses a learning difficulty identified by Discipline-Based Education Research. Most of them take a student about 10 minutes or less to complete. They are made with Vignette Studio, a free application that can be downloaded at www.compadre.org/ivv.