See Related: Science PD Models Research

Public Discussion

  • Icon for: Brian Drayton

    Brian Drayton

    Co-Principal Investigator
    May 11, 2015 | 02:36 p.m.

    This is great! I am curious if you see particular barriers to sustainability after the project ends? I could imagine that the citizen science framework makes it a lot easier to connect schools with science to do than was possible in the past!

  • Icon for: Judith Steiner

    Judith Steiner

    Presenter
    May 11, 2015 | 09:05 p.m.

    Yes, we are working hard to develop infrastructure that will promote sustained participation in CSR. That includes developing robust function of Professional Learning Teams and well established collaboration with practicing scientists leading projects that benefit from the contributions of the students. But as you mention, it will be interesting to see how effective this is in achieving sustainability. We hope to be able to follow this and develop additional research aimed at optimizing those outcomes in the future.

  • Icon for: Amy Busey

    Amy Busey

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 01:49 p.m.

    Thanks for sharing! Are you looking at how different aspects of this work are related to student attitudes, motivation, and engagement? I’m curious about how engagement could be related to several things, e.g., students engage in research that’s related to real and important issues that other students and scientists are also investigating…or the fact that the research their doing has a real connection to their own lives and communities.

  • Icon for: Judith Steiner

    Judith Steiner

    Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 07:50 a.m.

    Indeed, that is exactly our research agenda. We are examining the effect of participation in CSR on student engagement and motivation and the relationship of those constructs to mastery of State science standards. We are also comparing those relationships over grade levels for grades 3-8. We do intend to examine how student perception of the value of their work to their community and to the science community relates to these constructs as well.

  • Icon for: Michelle Perry

    Michelle Perry

    Facilitator
    May 12, 2015 | 04:48 p.m.

    This looks like a great project! A few questions: 1) the video mentioned what a few of the 3-5th graders are doing and it sounds like the next phase moves onto including the 6th-8th graders. Does this mean some of the students who participated in 3rd-5th grade will be involved again in the next few years? (I could see great benefit to this.) Also, will you continue to work with grades 3-5 in the next phase? 2) Does a class have only one project that they work on throughout the year? 3) Is there any sort of formal follow-up where students/classes review their work in the Globe database compared to others for an extended thinking/learning around their research’s impact?

  • Icon for: Judith Steiner

    Judith Steiner

    Presenter
    May 15, 2015 | 07:54 a.m.

    1) Yes, the grades 3-5 students will go on to experience the next level of participation as they enter grades 6-8. We are working with each cohort of teachers formally for a total of three years. We hope to remain in communication with them beyond that period. We are putting structures and practices in place that we hope will sustain these innovations beyond the term of the grant.

    2) Each classroom only works on one project during the year in collaboration with professional scientists leading that project.

    3) Yes, teachers are expected to guide their students in an examination of the full data set for their research project, comparing and contrasting their data and their findings with those of others who are involved in that project. They are learning that their data have greater value because it contributes to a larger effort and can be used in conjunction with the data that others have contributed to address real scientific questions. This is a central aspect of the project: students recognize that the work they are doing is real and has real value to others.

  • Further posting is closed as the showcase has ended.

  1. W. Robert Midden
  2. Project PI, NWO Director, Associate Vice Provost
  3. iEvolve with STEM
  4. http://cosmos.bgsu.edu/ievolve/index.htm
  5. Bowling Green State University
  1. Jessica Belcher
  2. Assistant Director of Finance & Operations
  3. iEvolve with STEM
  4. http://cosmos.bgsu.edu/ievolve/index.htm
  5. Bowling Green State University
  1. Jacob Burgoon
  2. Project Evaluator
  3. iEvolve with STEM
  4. http://cosmos.bgsu.edu/ievolve/index.htm
  5. Bowling Green State University
  1. Dr. Emilio Duran
  2. Project Co-PI, Associate Professor
  3. iEvolve with STEM
  4. http://cosmos.bgsu.edu/ievolve/index.htm
  5. Bowling Green State University
  1. Dr. Eric Worch
  2. Research Co-Director, Associate Professor
  3. iEvolve with STEM
  4. http://cosmos.bgsu.edu/ievolve/index.htm
  5. Bowling Green State University

iEvolve with STEM: Education Re-imagined in Sandusky, Ohio!
NSF Award #: 1238136

The iEvolve with STEM project is focused on engaging 3rd-8th grade students in real science research and empowering teachers to help students carry out that research. Through their involvement in Citizen Science Research projects that address real-world issues, students and teachers can make connections to many areas of learning, as well as make actual contributions to science. Bowling Green State University has partnered with two Ohio school districts, Perkins Local Schools and Sandusky City Schools, along with the Toledo Zoo, the Metroparks of the Toledo Area, the Erie Soil and Water Conservation District and the Ohio State University, to transform science education by helping teachers lay a strong foundation of inquiry learning, connecting teachers and students to authentic research projects and guiding teachers through action research. The hope is that student attitudes towards science, their motivation and engagement will increase as a result of their participation in the project.